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Ian Brodie

Ian Brodie teaches consultants, coaches and other professionals to attract and win their ideal clients by becoming seen as authorities in their field.


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7 Powerful Curiosity Building Strategies To Get Your Audience To Take Action

Posted on 23rd August 2016. 7 Powerful Curiosity-Building Strategies That Get Your Audience To Take Action

Last week I had a bit of a brain freeze and forgot to send out the email notifying everyone of the new 5 Minute Marketing Tip video.

Oops! But it gave me the chance to try a little experiment the next day.

One of the key methods to increase the open rates of your emails, clicks through to your articles and reading past the headline on your sales pages is to build curiosity. Remember Gary Bencivenga's formula: Interest = Benefits x Curiosity.

So I tested a straightforward subject line of “Get more engagement and interest from your customers and prospects” against a pure curiosity subject line of “Sorry – meant to send this yesterday :(“. Other than subject lines the emails were identical.

The aim of the first subject line is to get people to open the email because they know the benefit they'll get from it. The aim of the second subject line is to get people to open the email to find out what on earth I meant to send them yesterday, and perhaps why I didn't.

The results: the email with the plain subject line had an open rate of 32.3%, the email with the curiosity based subject line had an open rate of 36.7%. That's a 13% increase at 99.9% significance.

But more importantly the click through rate to the video was 5.4% for the plain subject line and 6.5% for the curiosity based subject line (a 21% increase with 95% significance). That indicates that not only did more people open the email to find out what I'd meant to send them, that increased number of opens didn't fizzle out when it came to taking action, they were motivated enough to click through to the video.

Now you can't make a mistake with every email or article and use a “sorry” type subject line or headline every time. It would wear pretty thin (not to mention being a bit dishonest if you were deliberately making mistakes).

But luckily there are many ways to harness curiosity in your emails, articles, sales pages and other marketing. And in this week's 5 Minute Marketing Tip video I share 7 powerful strategies you can use to harness curiosity.

Use them wisely young Padawan :)

Click here to watch the video »