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Ian Brodie

Ian Brodie

Ian Brodie teaches consultants, coaches and other professionals to attract and win the clients they need using "Value-Based Marketing" - an approach to marketing based around delivering value, demonstrating your capabilities and earning trust through your marketing.


LATEST POSTS

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The Best Way To Market To Corporate Clients 15th February 2020

My 3 Best Performing Landing Pages

So, just to be clear before we start; I'm not saying these are the best landing pages ever and you should copy them verbatim. I'm sure there are lots of improvements that could be made.

The goal of showing you these landing pages is to show you how you might vary your pages depending on the source and intent of visitors to those pages, as discussed in my “5 Minute Marketing Tip” on Landing Pages.

Facebook Ad

My Facebook Ad for the 21 Word Email

The first two landing pages are ones I use to direct visitors from Facebook Ads to.

The ads themselves offer my lead magnet (“The 21 Word Email That Can Get You More Clients”) so when someone hits the landing page they shouldn't need a lot more convincing. All they need is a quick and obvious path to get the report, and a reminder of the benefits of doing so.

In both cases the headline of the Ad is in the format <acquisition verb> <name of lead magnet>.

<acquisition verb> can be anything from “Discover” to “Copy” to “Steal” to “Grab” to “Get Free Access To”. I've found that all of these phrases that imply you'll get the thing immediately work better than “Learn” which implies that you're going to have to put a bunch of effort in before you can use it.

This format works well when the benefit of your lead magnet is in the name itself. If it isn't, you'll need to add the benefit (or problem solved) in the headline, for example “Discover 3 Simple Strategies For Reducing Energy Costs By Up To 23%”.

I also use a pre-headline. In the first landing page I'm playing on the idea that you're getting something really valuable for free with the “Steal this Client-Winning Email” pre-head. In the second I use the pre-head to qualify who this is for and clarify what they'll get (“Exclusive Email Template and Guidebook for Consultants, Coaches and Other Professionals”). Both options work well.

Finally, there's a “Get Free Instant Access” button which pops up the optin form.

In the first landing, I us a background image (which is actually of the 21 word email). In the second ad I show a picture of the lead magnet itself. I get slightly higher conversions with the first ad (perhaps it feels like less work since what you see is a short email rather than the cover of a report).

In theory, you want the images in your landing page to match those in your ad so that visitors know they've come to the right place. In this case I've not found it makes any difference

Both landing pages were built using the “Basic Squeeze Page” template on Leadpages – but you could reproduce either using any page building tool like Thrive Landing Pages or Optimizepress.

Short Landing Page Variation 1

Short Landing Page 1

Short Landing Page Variation 2

Short Landing Page 2

If the traffic to the page is coming from a source where I haven't had the chance to already tell them about the lead magnet, then I use a longer landing page format. In this format I add in a couple of extra elements:

  • Bullet points or a paragraph explaining the benefits they'll get from the lead magnet (usually the same language that would have been on an advert)
  • Social Proof in terms of companies I've worked for or media where I've been featured
  • Testimonials from people giving feedback on the lead magnet or on their experiences working with me

That extra information is needed to warm up colder traffic sources like links in social media profiles or perhaps from a mention on a page or email from someone recommending you. In those cases the original source page is unlikely to go into details on what the visitor can get by opting in, so you need to spell it out more.

This page uses the “Blog Home Page” template from Leadpages, though again, with a bit of work you should be able to reproduce it on any page builder.

Long Landing Page

Detailed Landing Page

And yeah, amazingly enough, that picture of me doesn't seem to put people off ;)

So hopefully these examples have shown you a couple of simple ways of tailoring your landing pages based on the source and intent of visitors to allow you to get better results from them.

ian-dash

*Those links to Leadpages, Thrive Landing Pages and Optimizepress are affiliate links. There are other tools you can use, but these are the ones I use myself. If you eventually buy a product from them I’ll get a commission. Consider it the online equivalent of buying me a beer :)

Ian Brodie

Ian Brodie

https://www.ianbrodie.com

Ian Brodie teaches consultants, coaches and other professionals to attract and win the clients they need using "Value-Based Marketing" - an approach to marketing based around delivering value, demonstrating your capabilities and earning trust through your marketing.

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